Photo of the Week | 21- 27 Mar 2016

Street Rythms Magazine is happy to announce its third “Photo of the Week” winner. The winning entry is selected from the photos posted in our Street Rythms Magazine Street Photography Group on Facebook. The winning entry is from Wan Zuharuddin.

It was very difficult for us to select the best one for the week, as there were really good submissions from members. We would like to specially mention following outstanding images

Photograph (c) Don Pagunsan‎

 

Congratulations!

Photo of the Week | 14- 20 Mar 2016

Street Rythms Magazine is happy to announce its third “Photo of the Week” winner. The winning entry is selected from the photos posted in our Street Rythms Magazine Street Photography Group on Facebook. The winning entry is from Chittaranjan Bhat from Pune.

It was very difficult for us to select the best one for the week, as there were really good submissions from members. We would like to specially mention following outstanding images

Photograph (c) Chris Tuarissa‎

Photograph (c) Arshad Ron

Photograph (c) Chalim Abdu Al-Mahika

 

photograph (c) Jo Simson‎

 

Congratulations!

 

Photo of the Week | 07- 13 Mar 2016

Street Rythms Magazine is happy to announce its third “Photo of the Week” winner. The winning entry is selected from the photos posted in our Street Rythms Magazine Street Photography Group on Facebook. The winning entry is from Muhammad Imam Hasan.

It was very difficult for us to select the best one for the week, as there were really good submissions from members. We would like to specially mention following outstanding images

Photograph copyright (c) Jo Simson

Photograph copyright (c) Chris Tuarissa

 

Photograph copyright (c) Win Hidayat

 

Photography copyright (c) Muhammad Imam Hasan

 

Photograph copyright (c) Johan Massot

 

Congratulations!

The game of Goat Fighting, Kolhapur

Kolhapur in Maharashtra, India is a Royal city, once the capital of the Great Maratha Kingdom. People here have very old and royal traditions which they are very proud of. Kolhpurkar’s (name for people of kolhapur) are fond of fighting games like mud-wrestling. They also organize animal fights and one such fighting game famous in Kolhapur is “Goat Fighting” also called as “Zunz” or “Takker”, where two specially breeded Male Goats fight Head-on with each other. The winning goats also win cash prizes here.

 

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all photographs copyright (c) Dipak Kumbhar. All rights reserved.

Tips: Street photography is mostly shooting from the hip

If you look at most of the street photographs, they are shot from the hip. The unusual perspective that you get by shooting from the hip, engages viewers. They feel they are part of the scene. I personally like to call it “Kids Eye View” or “Kids perspective”.

There are advantages of shooting from the hip in street. Firstly, you become invisible. When you pickup your camera at your eye level, start focusing the lens and point your camera at some one, people become aware of you and they start looking at you, giving unnatural poses. You loose the spontaneity of the scene. Most of the time you end up in Good Portraits rather than spontaneous Street Photographs.

Another advantage is the unusual perspective you get. This makes viewers feel like they are part of the scene. This makes your photographs more engaging.

(c) Dipak Kumbhar

Here are the tips to shoot from the hip.

#Tip 1: Always shoot in wide-angle
This is the most important rule in shooting street photographs. Using wide-angle helps capture everything in the scene. Also since you are shooting from the hip without looking through view-finder, there are chances you might not capture what you want to, if not shooting in wide-angle. Also with wide-angle you avoid getting flat images. The hip level perspective combined with wide-angle give you unusual shots, nice juxtapositions. The perspective you get, makes viewer get deeper into the scene. They feel part of the scene.

#Tip 2: Understand your lens’s hyperfocal distance
Hyperfocal distance is basically the distance that you can focus to at any given aperture, where the resulting depth of field will retain sharpness in the scene from as far away as infinity to the closest possible point. Understanding your lens hyperfocal distance is very important in getting sharp images throughout infinity.  Once you know your lens’s hyperfocal distance, you can pre-focus your lens on that distance and then you don’t have to adjust your focus again.

To know your lens’s hyperfocal distance, you can use free calculators available on internet.
Hypoerfocal calculators/tutorials on web:
1. http://www.digitalcameraworld.com/2013/02/08/how-to-calculate-hyperfocal-distance-free-photography-cheat-sheet/3/
2. http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/hyperfocal-distance.htm

#Tip 3: Use faster shutter speed
Faster shutter speeds are very important when it comes to capturing decisive moments. When you are shooting at hip level, the chances are that you are moving around, and in street there is lot of movement around you. Most of the time, your subjects are also moving. It is very important to shoot them at right moment, to freeze their motions.

#Tip 4: Use Auto-ISO Mode
From camera settings menu, set your camera to Auto-ISO. In changing light conditions, it helps to let camera decide light sensitivity by setting ISO values. This ensures that you always get faster shutter speeds. In street photography, you can use High ISO noise/grains creatively. When particular scene has good light conditions, you can always override Auto-ISO and set it to lower ISO settings like ISO 100 or ISO 200.

#Tip 5: Set your camera to Aperture Priority mode
Set you camera to Aperture priority mode and set your aperture to F18 or more. This will ensure that you get sharp focus through out the infinity. Also with this mode, camera automatically sets your shutter speed to optimum so that you don’t get slow shutter issues or camera shakes.

#Tip 6: Remember to lock your exposure
Take exposure of the scene and use your AE/AF Lock button to lock the exposure. You can change this if the scene lighting conditions changes. but most of the time, Exposure will not change. Set your camera metering mode to Adaptive/average or matrix so that camera will read exposure from whole scene rather than particular area.

#Tip 7: Pre-focus your lens
Pre-focus your lens in auto-mode on hyper-focal distance, probably on your hand or any object from which you want your scene to be in sharp focus. Once lens is focused, you can then set the camera/lens to Manual Focus and start shooting without worrying about focusing. You need to re-focus your lens only if scene requirements changes.

#Tip 8: Set your camera on Continuous Shooting mode
When you set your camera on continuous shooting mode, there is less chance that you miss the best shot. With a single click you can shoot the subjects continuously and out of all number of shots, you can select the best one.

#Tip 9: Remove lens filters
I suggest you to remove lens filters, especially if you have Polarising filters attached. In street photography, many a times Glass/mirror/water reflections is what you want to shoot. Filters like polarising filters will remove these reflections and you will miss those reflections. For a digital SLR, you don’t need UV filters. Only a clear glass filters to protect your lens is what you need.

divine war

(c) Nilesh Gawde

Featured Photographer: Rudy Boyer from France

Last week we had an opportunity of interviewing Rudy Boyer, a talented Street Photographer from France. We take this opportunity to present you Rudy Boyer as our Street Rythms Featured Photographer.

Rudy Boyer is 32 years old and lives in Nice, in the south of France. He is responsible for a structure analysis laboratory in the Construction/Building sector. Rudy is passionate about photography and music, he has been playing jazz guitar for ten years. He started Street Photography in 2013.

For Rudy, street photography is the best of photography, what happens in everyday life, scenes of joys, sorrows scenes, often very lonely! but life! it is also a big playground where he can express himself.

He shoots 95% of the time with Fuji x100s et and rest with Nikkon D700.

For aspiring street photographers, he suggests, “Open the books of famous photographers, go out and train again and again, go towards the essentials”.

About future of street photography, he says that like any fashion trend and ease of taking pictures, and of course also through to social networks, there will be more and more people getting into street photography. Then fashion will fade and what will remain will be real passionate…

We asked him about his style. He thinks that its primarily a state of mind. With time and influences, the look is changing and the desire to excel becomes larger. What he decides to get on the net is only 30% of his photos, so he just tried to be consistent. Its never really easy for him.

Rudy takes inspiration from Saul Leiter, Hary Gruyaert, Alex Webb, Nikos Economopoulus, Abbas Attar and also from many many others on flickr and facebook.

You can admire his work on Facebook | Flickr | Website

 

“Observation is the key of success in street photography” – Prashant Godbole

Prashant Godbole is a well known photographer. He began his career in the ad agency Lintas (now Lowe). He joined as an Art Director, where his first task was to do a campaign on Bajaj Scooters. His team’s ‘Hamara Bajaj’  campaign was an instant hit and injected a pride of ownership in scooter buyers. He chose slice-of-life images for the campaign, like a Parsi polishing his scooter, the aarti people perform when buying a new vehicle, and kids taking a ride with their father to school.

This became his visual style. He brought street photography into every ad campaign, be it for Killer Jeans, The Times of India, Shoppers Stop or Airtel. He has worked with great photographers like Swapan Parekh, Raghu Rai, Prabuddha and Tejal, and learned by observing how they work.

His first encounter with professional street photography happened by chance. While working on the ‘Express Yourself’ film for Airtel, Swapan was not available. So he took up the camera and started taking pictures. His campaign later won several awards. From that day onward, the camera has always has always been his companion, where ever he goes.

For him, street photography is like holding up a mirror to society, capturing the life of a moment on film, making room for instinct, telling a story, making you smile. In his words, we quote, “It tends to be ironic and often surprise you”. He says, in today’s global village, photography is the only thing that crosses barriers of language and happily transports viewers to different cultures.

When we asked him why he captures mostly in black and white, his answer was that he shoots digital so mostly in color, but he sees black and white images in his head. He recalls once jokingly telling a friend that his camera is color-blind.

Prashant never shoots with an idea or theme in mind. He stumbles upon the situation and waits for things to happen.

His photographs are simple, minimalistic and very artistic, thanks to his training in advertising. He feels that like an ad that tells that tells a story or communicate a message within seconds, images should be kept simple and to the point. Your visual should seek to be understood even by an illiterate person. Simple becomes powerful. Removing what is not the picture and what is not the message becomes art. He applies his training in his advertising to his street photography as well.

For him gear is not important, because, in his words, we quote, “You cannot become Abhinav Bindra by holding a peashooter in your hand”. But he also emphasize that what you do with your equipment will make all the difference.

Prashant finds inspiration in the works of Swapan Parekh, Raghu Rai and Raghubir Singh.

 


 

Below are few of his inspirational images. To see more of his work, visit his website www.prashantgodbole.com or follow him on Facebook. Bookmark him for your daily dose of inspiration.

Note: all the photographs in this article are copyright, © Prashant Godbole.